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Colne shop owner’s World War One find

Sandra Fernandeze owner Pendle Belles, Vintage & Collectables with a World War One compendium game she found while out on her stock hunting travels. She will be donating it to the Imperial War Museum after the war commemorations. Colne 16.07.2014

Sandra Fernandeze owner Pendle Belles, Vintage & Collectables with a World War One compendium game she found while out on her stock hunting travels. She will be donating it to the Imperial War Museum after the war commemorations. Colne 16.07.2014

  • by Rebecca Cohen
 

A special piece of World War One history has tugged on the heartstrings of a Colne businesswoman.

For although collectables and vintage items are an every day part of Sandra Fernandeze’s life, there is one item she will not be putting on the shelves of her Albert Road store.

The owner of Pendle Belles Vintage and Collectables was on one of her usual stock hunting travels when she came across a World War One compendium game in mint condition.

On the front of the poignant piece is the Lancashire name Ridehalgh, and according to the National Archives website this means the game could have belonged to one of 58 soldiers.

Former financial advisor Sandra, who opened her store in October last year, said: “It was like all my Christmas’ had come at once. I went to Burnley specifically looking for war games, as I thought they would look nice in the shop. Because the compendium is quite small I discovered it inside another game - I just couldn’t believe it when I saw it.

“Every time I touch it or talk about it I get goosebumps, and it is singularly my best find. I will never find anything that means so much to me.

“I have got a passionate interest in both world wars, and when I lived in London I used to go the Imperial War Museum once a month, because I find it very moving and interesting.”

Following the World War One commemorations, Sandra plans on donating the piece of history to the Imperial War Museum, in either London or Manchester.

But before it is whisked away, she is giving residents the opportunity to take a photograph of the piece of history.

The 48-year-old added: “I will struggle to part with it, but the only way I am justifying it that I know it is 100% going to the right place. It will be kept safe.

“Lots of people have been photographing it, and I would welcome anybody to come in before it goes off to the museum.”

 

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