Environmental crime team out on the streets of Nelson

Coun. James Starkie, Jeff Charnock with his dog Roxy and senior enviromental crime officer David Alexander and his team at the MUGA on Regent Street looking out for litter and dog mess. A260111/3
Coun. James Starkie, Jeff Charnock with his dog Roxy and senior enviromental crime officer David Alexander and his team at the MUGA on Regent Street looking out for litter and dog mess. A260111/3
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Pendle Council’s Environmental Crime Team education day has been hailed as a step in the right direction by organisers.

The four-strong team of officers, along with Dog Welfare Officers and Coun. James Starkie, spent a day out and about on the streets of Nelson and by the games area in Regent Street educating people on littering and dog fouling.

Free poop scoop bags were handed out to dog walkers who were reminded about their responsibilities to clear up after their dogs, while pedestrians were asked not to drop litter, but to use litter bins or take their rubbish home.

Coun. Starkie, who represents the team, said: “The majority of Pendle residents are responsible citizens, but there are some areas around the borough where we have specific problems with litter and dog fouling - Regent Street is one of them.

“The enforcement team has already done plenty of high visibility patrols in the area and they have issued some fixed penalty notices for dog fouling.

“But we’d much rather educate people about their responsibilities and the penalties if they continue to litter or allow their dogs to foul.”

David Alexander, a Senior Environmental Crime Officer who heads up the enforcement team, said: “We know that many schoolchildren buy their breakfast or lunch in ASDA then eat it on the way to school. Sadly, not all of them use a litter bin to dispose of the packaging.

“We’re planning to talk to young people to remind them of the need to put their litter in a bin and to warn them of the fines if they don’t.”

The day proved to be a positive one for Pendle Council’s Dog Welfare Officers with several members of the public agreeing to have their dogs microchipped or neutered.

Dog Welfare Officer Laura Robinson said: “It’s a good start, one of the dogs has been microchipped this morning. In future, we’ll not be as highly visible so we’ll see if the good response is maintained.”