FOULRIDGE: Outdoor activity centre plans put on hold

horse and car
horse and car

COUNCILLORS have put plans for an activity centre in Foulridge on hold until they have completed a site visit.

Cobwebs Adventure, an outdoor activity company, has applied to change the use of agricultural land off Cob Lane to an outdoor centre.

The application includes the demolition of an existing building, erection of a facilities building, alterations to access and creation of 10 parking spaces.

Cobwebs Adventure run outdoor pursuits, including guided walks, cycling and team building exercises, but would use the centre in Cob Lane mainly for workshops, training days and to store equipment.

Some residents have expressed concerns over the effect on residential amenity, traffic and impact on wildlife.

Mr A. Tattersall said: “As the owner of the farm next to the proposed development I am opposed the field being changed from agriculture. The wildlife in this area is abundant, with sparrowhawks, badger sets and kestrels.”

Other residents said they were worried about an increase in traffic on the road leading to the site.

Mr and Mrs Talbot said: “Cob Lane is a single track lane which is not particularly well maintained, is not lit and has very few passing places. It was built to service the local farms and residences and has not been upgraded in any way. Traffic has increased in recent years and the lane cannot cope with any additional vehicles.”

Traffic and development engineer, Trevor Lewis added: “I have reservations about the suitability of a development like this using Cob Lane for access. This road is very narrow and there is limited opportunity for passing.

“Encouraging additional traffic to travel along this road will result in traffic jams and frustrated drivers.”

But Pendle Council’s planning officers have given the proposal the green light, saying that it is acceptable in terms of land use, appearance, impact and amenity.

Case officer, Lee Greenwood, said: “The design of the building means it is not prominent in the landscape. Set against the existing boundary treatment, its impact on the skyline from wider views is limited and no greater than the existing field store structure.”

Mr Greenwood also attempted to alley residents fears over access to the development and traffic on the road.

“The proposed access point has been changed and has been positioned further up Cob Lane rather than on the bend in the road as previously suggested. This will be closed off for vehicles and restricted to pedestrians only. The access is also located adjacent to a wider section of Cob Lane with a passing place already in situ, allowing for greater manoeuvrability.

“Group transport to the site will be provided and all activities are pre booked so that applicant feels this will give them control over the frequency and amount of movement.”