Villages’ neighbourhood plan idea collapses

The Lidgett triangle and Boulsworth. Pic: Mark Rogers.
The Lidgett triangle and Boulsworth. Pic: Mark Rogers.
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A proposed Neighbourhood Plan for the eastern edge of Colne and rural villages has been shelved.

The steering group of the East Colne and Villages Neighbourhood Plan has abandoned the idea after Trawden Forest Parish Council voted unanimously to pull out of discussions.

A lot of the work we have done over the last year has whetted the appetite of local people for having a more proactive say about how their area develops

David Cockburn-Price

The plan had been aimed at giving local people a more proactive say about how their area develops but as talks advanced, the idea broke down.

Adele Waddington, Clerk to Trawden Forest Parish Council, says they are now going it alone.

She said: “It was decided to end the process because we feel Trawden is very different to the two other areas. The village is long and thin and is a cul-de-sac.

“We have always been keen to keep the identity of the village and promote ‘infill’ to protect its heritage and character. The fear is we will eventually join up with Colne.

“We also feared that if The Rough didn’t go through at appeal, we may then be expected to take a huge application in the village on an as yet unidentified piece of land down the line and that is not a risk we were willing to take.

“We are now working on our own plan and are at the very early stages of that.

“The parish council hopes that members of the community will wish to participate, and anyone interested in being involved should attend a meeting at Trawden Community Centre at 7pm on Monday, June 13th where a steering group will be established to progress the plan.”

David Cockburn-Price, Chairman of the Neighbourhood Plan’s Steering Group and Treasurer of the Lidgett and Beyond Charity, said: “The area designated made a lot of sense geographically and in most respects was a sensible one for setting policies, but when the group started looking deeper into the policies for land development, in particular, some unanswerable questions and potential incompatibility issues began to arise.

“A lot of the work we have done over the last year has whetted the appetite of local people for having a more proactive say about how their area develops.

“I’m very pleased to have inspired and energised people in this way. With the official public consultation and local planning authority review underway, I’d heard of a large number of letters and emails of support.

“The task now will be to keep that localism momentum going and to keep working to protect and enhance what’s special about this area.”