Grade II listing for Nelson Scout memorial

Deputy Mayor of Pendle Coun. Tony Beckett lays his wreath at the Nelson Scout War Memorial. A081109/5c
Deputy Mayor of Pendle Coun. Tony Beckett lays his wreath at the Nelson Scout War Memorial. A081109/5c

A Pendle war memorial created in memory of Nelson Scouts who died in the First World War has been given a national honour - it has been added to the list of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest.

The Boy Scout War Memorial is in Market Square outside Nelson Library. It was created in 1919 and was in Victoria Park for decades before moving to the town centre in 1998.

Scoutmaster Robinson said that, as far as he could trace, 105 Nelson Scouts had made the supreme sacrifice and 156 of his own boys had joined the colours

English Heritage

It has now been granted a Grade II listing, which means it will be protected and included in the National Heritage List for England.

Pendle Council, which owns the memorial, the Historic Environment Record, the Pendle and Burnley Scout Group, East Lancashire Scouts and War Memorials Trust were invited to comment in the consultation process needed to get the monument listed.

English Heritage revealed: “On October 24th, 1919, the Nelson Leader reported the unveiling ceremony in Victoria Park of a war memorial commemorating Scouts from the town who had lost their lives fighting in the First World War.

“It was stated the grit stone memorial depicting a Boy Scout ‘was the first to be erected to the fallen Scouts in England’.

“It was intended to mark the sacrifice and heroism of these former Scouts of Nelson and act as inspiration to the rising generation and was accordingly situated overlooking the playing fields in the park.

“Scoutmaster Robinson said that, as far as he could trace, 105 Nelson Scouts had made the supreme sacrifice and 156 of his own boys had joined the colours.”

The sculptor was Job Davies and the memorial cost £150. He used local boy John Abraham Moore as a model. Moore belonged to the St John’s Scouts who met in Leeds Road and was reported to have been everyone’s idea of what a Scout should be.

Mr Les Ridings of Nelson – Burnley and Pendle District Scouts administrator – said: “This is a unique memorial in this country and featured in a scouting magazine article I wrote in 1997. That article was submitted as part of the application by English Heritage. I’m absolutely chuffed that this is happening.”