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Campaign launched to get Lancashire households recycling more

County Coun. Albert Atkinson, deputy leader, and Janine Lund, waste management officer, showing how much more the average household could recycle each week.
County Coun. Albert Atkinson, deputy leader, and Janine Lund, waste management officer, showing how much more the average household could recycle each week.
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A new campaign aims to highlight that the average Lancashire household could recycle 50% more if everyone always put the right thing in the right bin.

Each property across the county produces 4.2kg of recycling a week, but the council believes a further 2.1kg could be potentially recycled - equivalent to every household saving around another 13 aluminium cans, two wine bottles, four big plastic pop bottles, and four newspapers.

Many of the extra items that could be recycled are found outside the kitchen, with people being asked to increase their effort to recycle more things like aerosols, small glass bottles, and packaging from the bathroom and bedroom.

It could result in another 50,000 tonnes of recycling a year, adding to the 100,000 tonnes currently collected at the doorstep, and 50,000 tonnes collected at household waste recycling centres.

It could also save up to £4m a year which could be spent on other vital public services.

The campaign, launched during Recycle Week which starts today, is being led on social media using a short animation to illustrate how much more could be recycled.

County Coun. Albert Atkinson, deputy leader for Lancashire County Council with responsibility for waste, said: "Most people are pretty good at recycling and it's just part of our normal routine, but there's still a significant proportion of things which could be recycled which are being wasted and going straight to landfill because they've been put in the wrong bin.

"Our new campaign seeks to highlight the size of that missing mountain of recycling, and the potential we all have to make a significant difference by making a little extra effort.

"Most of us are in the habit of recycling in the kitchen as that's where we have room for separate recycling bins, but most of us are still missing some recyclable items. And nearly 4 in 10 people say they don’t always recycle bathroom items.

"So much from elsewhere in the house can be recycled – plastic shower gel and shampoo bottles, spray cleaner and bleach bottles, aerosol cans, and cardboard toothpaste boxes and toilet roll tubes. If more people recycled these things it could really make a difference and take Lancashire's recycling rates to the next level.

"There are some very simple things we can do to make it easy to recycle upstairs. These include hanging a bag on the bathroom door or putting items in a cupboard or drawer until there's enough to take to the recycling bin. You could also re-purpose a nice box or basket to collect your empties, get a small bathroom recycling bin, or simply leave them on the landing and take them to the main recycling bin next time you're passing."