Creative Colne tots enjoy magical St George’s Day celebrations

Safe Hands Nursery in Colne dress up for St. George's Day. Pictured are four-year-olds Charlie Kitto and Alfie Wynne, with staff memebers Emma Hacking, Donna Airey and Claire Astin. Photo: Georgie Brewster
Safe Hands Nursery in Colne dress up for St. George's Day. Pictured are four-year-olds Charlie Kitto and Alfie Wynne, with staff memebers Emma Hacking, Donna Airey and Claire Astin. Photo: Georgie Brewster

A couple of weeks of exploring courage, creativity and chivalry culminated in a huge St George’s Day celebration at a Colne nursery.

Throughout April, staff and pupils at Safehands Green Start Nursery have been focusing their attention on all things patriotic.

Youngsters have enjoyed a trip into Colne town centre, where they had fun buying books and toys relating to the English patron saint.

And they have also put their artistic skills to the test, creating a dragon out of cardboard boxes, and producing paintings.

On Tuesday, the tots had a fabulous time dressing up in St George’s Day costumes, baking and reading stories.

Nursery manager Claire Astin, who has been at the Derby Street site for the past two years, said: “It has been a real success.

“All the children have been really excited, and full of beans.

“It is one of the biggest events we’ve done really, and it is nice that the children can get involved in something like this.”

St George’s Day was established back in 1222, but it was not until 1348 that St George became the Patron Saint of England.

The celebration is no longer classed as a national holiday, after the union with Scotland at the end of the 18th Century.

Safehands Green Start Nursery decided to embrace the annual event, to help educate the children on the history and customs of the day.

The nursery has recently received a huge boost, after being taken over in a £2.5million deal in December.

At the forefront of Green Start’s ethos is developing an interest in healthy food in children.

They encourage children to help out growing produce and to aid the nursery staff in the kitchens, seeing their meals from “seeds to food on the plate”.