Pendle students speak at London conference on conflict

The six students from Walverden Primary School with their Headteacher, Mrs Ahmed, and the school's Chair of Governors, Mr Khaliq.
The six students from Walverden Primary School with their Headteacher, Mrs Ahmed, and the school's Chair of Governors, Mr Khaliq.
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Students from Pendle primary schools have had the privilege of travelling to London to speak at 'Children’s Voices for Peace' international conference, where they learned about the impact of conflict on young people and education.


Six Year 5 pupils from Walverden Primary School were invited to the event by the South Asian Development Partnership, while children from Pendle Vale and Barrowford Primary also attended the event.

Hosted at Portcullis House in Westminster, the conference allowed the Walverden students - who went to the capital with their Headteacher, Humma Ahmed, and the school's Chair of Governors, Farhan Khaliq - to learn about the children, young people, and women affected by conflict and propose ways of tackling the radicalisation and violence that is placing increasing pressure on young people in the UK.

"It was about the major conflicts in the world, and how people are affected and getting their perspective," explained Ms Ahmed. "There were a range of speeches by children and women on topics such as the impact of conflict on education and on the journey of refugees. It was good to get the different perspectives to get their experiences.

The conference also saw the former Home Secretary, Amber Rudd, give a speech of her own just a day before she resigned from her post as a result of the Windrush scandal, while a panel of MPs answered any questions the children had before the students took part in a workshop to share proposals for working for peace.

"It was really good, some of the children hadn't been on tubes and trains so just going down was an experience in itself," Ms Ahmed added, with the children having also enjoyed a brief tour of the Houses of Parliament. "They were amazed at some of the things they listened to; it was a really full, packed day, and they got loads out of it."