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Price is right for Colne as James agrees a return to the Horsfield

James Price
James Price
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Colne may have finished south of the Lancashire League’s equator but professional James Price did everything in his power to try and ensure that was not the case.

The South African all-rounder completed the 2018 campaign as the third highest scoring paid man in the 24-team division, finishing up on 811 runs overall.

The 26-year-old, born in Port Elizabeth, rounded off the season with an average of 36.86 from 24 matches, the 16th best in that structure of players who had featured more than 10 times.

The former Eastern Province representative, who has also made cameo appearances for Enfield and Nelson previously, added a high score of 120, scored against Haslingden at Bentgate in April.

Price, who was behind Rishton’s Mansoor Amjad and Todmorden’s Chris Schofield, has agreed to stay on at the Horsfield for another season as Colne start in the bottom tier of the league’s new structure.

Chairman Gary Hunt said: “We’re delighted to have agreed terms with James for next season, having been really impressed with both is attitude and performances on and off the field.

“Pricey has shown thus far he’s capable of scoring big runs and we are looking forward to seeing more of that in 2019.”

Nelson’s Reeza Hendricks had been going well at Seedhill before returning home to inspire South Africa to an ODI Series win over Sri Lanka.

The Kimberley-born batsman, 29, posted 302 runs from 11 innings, averaging 30.20, with a high score of 106. But his season was cut short having received the call to return to his homeland.

Hendricks smashed a century on his one-day international debut to set up South Africa’s series-clinching 78-run victory over Sri Lanka in the third match in Pallekele last month.

His 102 off 89 deliveries meant that Hendricks became only the third South African batsman to register a hundred in his first ODI. Colin Ingram and Temba Bavuma are the other two.

Price didn’t feature as prominently in the hierarchy of bowlers but his 26 wickets certainly helped pull his side out of a few sticky situations.

Hendricks, on the other hand, was in the thick of it until his departure. He finished with 23 wickets and his average of 19.08, with a best of 5-31, was the 12th most impressive return on offer of those who had delivered more than 500 balls.

Meanwhile, amateur batsman David Crotty was hot on the heels of his pro. The 32-year-old, who has spent the majority of his career at the club, with a brief stint at Earby breaking up his stretch, closed the term with 658 runs.

That total, from 19 matches played, was the eighth best statistic on show in the senior rankings, with the exception of contributions made by club professionals.

The opening batsman hit a high score of 139 as Nelson racked up a club record 350-3 last month, though his efforts weren’t quite enough to help the club qualify for the Lancashire League’s top flight.

His average of 43.86 was 10th on the ladder of batsmen who had been involved in 15 innings or more.

Australian cricketer Caleb Grant may make a living out of crafting bespoke bats but it was the 30-year-old’s excellence with the ball that stood him out from the crowd.

Grant, who had delivered a considerably smaller number of balls than his rivals at the summit, ended the campaign as the 10th most dangerous bowler, the sixth most prolific amateur, when totalling 43 wickets.

Grant, who came to England from Melbourne as an overseas professional for a North Yorkshire cricket club, before relocating to Pendle, posted a season best 5-16 while his average of 12.74 was the 11th highest figure on offer for individuals who had delivered more than 500 balls.